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The History Of Personalised Cufflinks

What are cufflinks used for ?

Cufflinks are a piece of jewellery that are used for securing the cuffs on dress shirts.

What shirts can you wear cufflinks with ?

You require a long sleeved shirt with double cuffs (French cuffs), the double cuffs have holes on both cuffs, these holes are were the cufflinks pass through to keep the cuffs together.

  

Where did cufflinks come from ?

Cufflinks first originated in the 1600's but became more commonly used by the 18th century.  Men originally used ribbons or ties to hold their cuffs together. Then chains were used with a silver or gold buttons on either end.  

Cufflink designs were then created using semi-precious gemstones and more elaborate designs were then designed by Jewellers.

In the 17th century the Royals wore cufflinks especially King Charles II who was recognised for his style and fashion.  King Charles II regularly wore cufflinks to functions and helped to influence this style to the general public.

Cufflinks were then used at special events, royal occasions and gifts.

 

What are cufflinks made of ?  

Cufflinks can be made from many different materials.

Glass, stone, leather, metal (brass, stainless steel)  or precious metals such as sterling silver cufflinks or gold.

 

Engraved Cufflinks

Cufflinks were originally engraved by hand.  In the Victorian era the designs were very elaborate with fancy scrolls and large patterns.  Nowadays cufflink designs range from engraved initials, names, border patterns or engraving the entire cufflink.

We engrave our cufflinks exactly the same as many years ago.  All of our cufflinks are hand engraved with small graver tools.  The silver is deeply cut out and the initials are hand drawn on the cufflinks before engraving.

We are passionate about keeping Hand Engraving alive as we believe it is a beautiful craft, the quality of engraving is far superior to a machine and as the lettering or design is deeply cut out it will last forever.

Personalised Silver Cufflinks